About Sarina

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Sarina is a tribal fusion dancer known for her quirky musical choices and her vaudeville style infused in her costuming and dance. Whether she is dancing as an Orion slave dancer at Trek Theatre production, a steampunk performance at Fusion Friendly Events, a 1920’s jazz piece, or to her newest favorite soundtrack at a No Shame Eugene, she has a lot of fun with the art form.

Sarina has been belly dancing for about 20 years, taking her first dance class with her mother in a little community center while she was a teenager. From that time she moved on to study tribal in Portland at Gypsy Caravan and Euphoria, and tribal fusion with Severina and Znama Studio, as well as with private instructors. While living in Japan, she studied Turkish style belly dance, break dance and salsa, and taught tribal fusion belly dance. Because she has also studied flamenco, tango and Hawaian hula, these also are infused in her dance. Sarina often draws on moves from other dance styles to meld with belly dance, depending on what feels appropriate with the style of music. Her costuming is often inspired by a theme started by her musical choice, and she makes and sells many of her costumes locally.

Currently Sarina teaches Beginning Tribal Fusion and Intermediate Tribal Fusion at Willamalane in Springfield and Bellylicious Workout on Wednesdays at multiple locations and private lessons in her dance studio.


Recent Blog Posts

Three Fun Dance Videos

on Thu, 13 Apr, 2017

Three Fun Dance Videos

I enjoy humor and dance and so it would be natural I would enjoy a combination of the two. Every once in a while, a funny dance video pops up in someone’s Facebook feed and I save it for later. I got a kick out of these. I hope you also will get a kick out of these videos as much as I did.

Ten Tribal and Tribal Fusion Belly Dance Bras and Belts for Performances

on Sun, 26 Mar, 2017

Ten Tribal and Tribal Fusion Belly Dance Bras and Belts for Performances

Tribal and Tribal Fusion Belly Dance Bras and Belts for Performances

People sometimes ask me what the difference is between Tribal and Tribal Fusion. There are different dance moves, styling and music that might differentiate the two divisions of belly dance. The easiest and quickest difference to spot is visually in the costumes. Tribal will have more tassels, cowrie shells, little mirrors, ethnic jewelry and ethnic fabric patterns. Tribal fusion will probably have more grommets, studs, spikes, and chains. Both will probably have coins and metal and there is some overlap in the materials used. One of the things that I really like about tribal and tribal fusion costumes is the upcycled materials and the relative thriftiness of cost in making a tribal fusion costume as opposed to a cabaret costume.

Over the years I have made many belly dance costumes. In this post I am featuring the bras and belts I have made for tribal and tribal fusion performances. Some of these I wore in Portland when I was a student at Gypsy Caravan Studio and Euphoria Studio, some when I lived in Hokkaido, Japan and some I still wear in Eugene when I have performed at Medge (the Middle Eastern Dance Guild of Eugene), Fusion Friendly Events, No Shame Eugene or other belly dance performances.

1. First Bra—Eastern European/Gypsy

My mother knew I was experimenting with belly dance fashion and sewing costumes. She found a dress at the thrift store with pretty trim and bought it for me. I removed all the trim and sewed it onto a black bra. It looked unfinished for a long time. Then I added the pearls and it looked done. I like to wear this bra with the pearl belt I made to match

10 Simple Tricks to Help You Keep Your Belly Dance Sword From Sliding Off Your Sweaty Head

on Mon, 27 Feb, 2017

10 Simple Tricks to Help You Keep Your Belly Dance Sword From Sliding Off Your Sweaty Head

Part of dancing with a sword that makes it impressive is balancing it well enough that it doesn’t drop off your head. It also is far more impressive if that sword doesn’t fall on your foot while you are performing. I’ve balanced my sword on the top of my head, on my chin, chest and hip depending on what moves I am doing. Below are some basic tips before you even start dancing to keep the sword from sliding around.

1.Use a balanced sword.

If you are purchasing in person it is something you can check but if you are ordering from the internet it is important you read the details carefully and you know what you are getting. I’ve written about my belly dance woes in a previous post: 5 Important Details You Need to Know for Selecting a Belly Dance Sword.

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Classes

Classes

Improve fitness and core strength while working out to great world music and learning the basics of belly dancing. Class emphasizes posture and stretching to avoid injury, muscle isolation for improving strength and repetition for a balanced workout. Sarina teaches classes at Willamalane in Springfield and the Reach Center in Eugene.


Performances

Performances

Sarina performs her alternative tribal fusion belly dance style at many venues in Eugene and sometimes Portland, Oregon. Whether she is steampunk belly dancing to neo-Victorian music, using her flamenco/burseque fusion fans with a 1920's flair, gypsy skirt twirling, clowning it up at Cirque du Eugene, or fusing break dance and belly dance to a Star Trek remixed music, she brings creativity and fun to the dance.

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